Haslam alludes to criminal justice reform push next year

CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLY5 things to watch in the Tennessee legislature (Feb. 5) | 1:05

Tennessee lawmakers are back in session. Here are five things to watch for the week of Feb. 5. Joel Ebert and Duane W. Gang / The Tennessean

1 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLY3 takeaways from Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State address | 1:00

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam on Jan. 30, 2017 gave his annual State of the State address before the General Assembly. Here are three takeways from his speech, the next to last before leaving office. Joel Ebert and Duane W. Gang / The Tennessean / Wochit

2 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYGov. Haslam's 2017-18 education budget | 1:02

Gov. Bill Haslam's 2017-18 budget includes $100 million for teacher pay raises and $22.2 million for English-language learning students. Jason Gonzales / The Tennessean / Wochit

3 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYSen. Doug Overbey discusses wildfire recovery | 2:27

Sen. Doug Overbey discussed wilfire recovery efforts Tuesday in the Senate finance committee meeting in Nashville. Jake Lowary/Tennessean

4 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYRep. David Hawk reacts to State of the State | 2:43

Rep. David Hawk, R-Greeneville, reacts to Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State address Jan. 30 at the capitol. Jake Lowary/Tennessean

5 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYSen. Jim Tracy reacts to State of the State | 1:56

Sen. Jim Tracy, R-Shelbyville, reacts to Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State address Jan. 30 at the capitol. Jake Lowary/Tennessean

6 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYNashville Democrats react to State of the State | 1:15

Democrats Rep. Mike Stewart and Sen. Jeff Yarbro, both of Nashville, react to State of the State address Jan. 30 at the capitol. Jake Lowary/Tennessean

7 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYRaw video: Haslam discusses 2018 budget proposal | 5:51

Gov. Bill Haslam outlined his 2018 budget with reporters on Jan. 30 at the capitol. Jake Lowary/Tennessean

8 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYSenator Mark Norris reacts to State of the State pt. 2 | 0:00

State of the State Kirk Bado / The Tennessean

9 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYSenator Mark Norris reacts to State of the State pt. 1 | 0:00

Norris reacts to State of the State.

10 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLY5 things to watch in the Tennessee legislature (Week of Feb. 1) | 0:35

Here are 5 big topics coming up to watch for this week in the 110th General Assembly. Jake Lowary / The Tennessean / Wochit

11 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYGov. Haslam wants to expand broadband access to Tennesseans | 3:36

Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017 announced efforts to expand broadband access. Adam Tamburin/The Tennessean

12 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYGov. Haslam outlines broadband initiative | 1:03

Gov. Bill Haslam announced the latest plank of his legislative agenda — a broadband initiative — Thursday morning at Cane Ridge High School in Antioch. Haslam's plan will provide $45 million over 3 years in grants and tax credits for service providers. The governor said the plan focuses on three broad issues: funding, cutting regulation and education — "digital literacy." Karen Kraft / The Tennessean

13 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLY5 things to know about Gov. Haslam's IMPROVE Act proposal | 1:11

The plan, which is officially known as the Improving Manufacturing, Public Roads and Opportunities for a Vibrant Economy or IMPROVE ACT was unveiled on Wednesday. Karen Kraft / The Tennessean

14 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYSen. Doug Overbey discusses Gatlinburg recovery | 1:06

Sen. Doug Overbey discusses Gatlinburg recovery after a meeting Thursday at the legislature in Nashville. Jake Lowary / The Tennessean

15 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYKey legislative issues to watch | 1:42

With lawmakers set to return to Nashville on Tuesday to officially convene the 110th General Assembly, the session is expected to cover a multitude of issues ranging from a potential gas tax increase to how to spend the state's budget surplus. Kyleah Starling/The Tennessean

16 of 17CLOSESkip in x

Embed

x

Share

110TH TENNESSEE GENERAL ASSEMBLYRon Ramsey readies to leave Lt. Governor post | 0:47

Outgoing Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey talks about retiring from the leadership position in the Tennessee legislature. Lacey Atkins / Tennessean

17 of 17

  • 5 things to watch in the Tennessee legislature (Feb. 5)
  • 3 takeaways from Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State address
  • Gov. Haslam's 2017-18 education budget
  • Sen. Doug Overbey discusses wildfire recovery
  • Rep. David Hawk reacts to State of the State
  • Sen. Jim Tracy reacts to State of the State
  • Nashville Democrats react to State of the State
  • Raw video: Haslam discusses 2018 budget proposal
  • Senator Mark Norris reacts to State of the State pt. 2
  • Senator Mark Norris reacts to State of the State pt. 1
  • 5 things to watch in the Tennessee legislature (Week of Feb. 1)
  • Gov. Haslam wants to expand broadband access to Tennesseans
  • Gov. Haslam outlines broadband initiative
  • 5 things to know about Gov. Haslam's IMPROVE Act proposal
  • Sen. Doug Overbey discusses Gatlinburg recovery
  • Key legislative issues to watch
  • Ron Ramsey readies to leave Lt. Governor post

Gov. Bill Haslam speaks to a Republican gathering in Nashville on Monday, Feb. 6, 2017.(Photo: Erik Schelzig / AP)

Gov. Bill Haslam considered including criminal justice reform as part of his legislative agenda this year but ultimately decided with everything else he was trying to accomplish it would be better to wait until 2018, he said Monday.

Speaking to a group of about 100 people in the downtown Nashville law office of Waller on Monday, Haslam fielded a question about the state‘s criminal justice system while saying his office plans on looking at “various justice reform packages” in the future.

The governor said the state has been in talks and is meeting with outside organizations that work on criminal justice reform efforts in various capacities.

Haslam said criminal justice reform probably would be part of his efforts in 2018.

After the event, Haslam elaborated on his remarks, telling reporters the decision to hold off on criminal justice reform was due to the fact that his legislative agenda is filled with other work, including his push to increase the state‘s gas tax to pay for backlogged infrastructure projects.

“It‘s strictly a capacity issue. We have a limited governor‘s staff; there‘s only so much of our work that they can do,” he said.

In recent years, Haslam has made allusions to moving forward on criminal justice reform in Tennessee.  he introduced the Public Safety Act, which made several changes to the criminal justice system.

The measure retooled community supervision in an effort to reduce the number of people returning to prison for probation and parole violations each year. At the same time, Haslam‘s Public Safety Act established mandatory minimum sentences for individuals convicted of three or more charges of aggravated burglary or drug trafficking while also increasing penalties for anyone with three or more domestic violence convictions.

This year Haslam‘s legislative agenda places a focus on increasing broadband access for the state‘s rural communities and expanding an already popular program to provide tuition free to Tennesseans, in addition to the gas tax proposal.

As was the case in 2016, this year lawmakers have already introduced several bills, ranging from solitary confinement for juveniles to penalties for stalkers, related to criminal justice reform.

Reach Joel Ebert at  or and on Twitter .

 

MOST POPULAR STORIES

3 CONNECTCOMMENTEMAILMORERead or Share this story: http://tnne.ws/2jVTTLi